What to do on April the 25th

As you may know, every year, on April the 25th we celebrate the Red Carnation Revolution. It was a non-violent revolution that put a end to a long lasting fascist dictatorship.

Being such a recent and emblematic date, there isn’t much open in this day. However, not many places open don’t really mean that there isn’t a lot going on.

If you’re in Lisbon and are wondering what you should be doing today, the answer is simple: join the crowd!

At 3pm starts a cheerful parade along Avenida Liberdade. Foklore groups, brass bands, people dressed in traditional customs and everybody else walk and sing along this avenue to celebrate the freedom of speech.

Worried about the dress code? That’s simple: buy a red carnation and you will immediately make part of the group.

“Portugal is, and there I will be, happy” – Ruy Belo

Lisbon’s underground Roman museum

     If you were reading about Lisbon, this weekend, you may have heard about the Roman galleries that only open 3 days a year, being submerged by Tagus river during the rest of the time.

     Lisbon was once an important city for the romans and to prove that, there are a number of roman vestiges. These galleries are by far the most famous ones. The media coverage about this place is huge and so are the lines.

     What few people know is that there is another underground museum area, with roman ruins, underneath the city center.

     I’m talking about the Archaeological Center of Millenium BCP (a Portuguese bank). It’s located underneath the downtown area and you get to walk under the main building and see a former roman house and fish salting factory.

     It is open from Monday to Saturday, from 10am to 5pm and has guided tours (mandatory) starting at every sharp hour. It’s not recommended for those who suffer from claustrophobia but it’s definitely something different to do while in Lisbon.

If you really want to visit this place, here are the contacts.

And 2014th’s best custard is….

      Yesterday during the festival “Fish in Lisbon” it was announced the winner of 2014th’s best custard. This year the great winner was the pastry shop “Alcoa”, from Alcobaça, and here at LisbonStories we can’t wait for our next tour to Alcobaça, to try one.

     By now you’re probably confused: “I thought that the best custards could be found in Lisbon, in that famous pastry-shop in Belem?!”

     “Pastéis the Belém” can only be found in that famous pastry shop as it is said that they’re made with a secret recipe, invented by the monks who lived in St Jerome monastery, right by its side. Belém is indeed the name of the district.

     “Pastéis de Nata”, same thing than custards, but different name, are the ones that can be found everywhere else in the world. They taste just like the first ones, with the exception of the name… and the secret.

     Is there such a big difference? Honestly, no. Maybe the ones in Belem are crunchier as they’re served warm, but that’s about it. I love them, but after trying the ones served in Aloma, the 2013 winner, I couldn’t decide which is my favorite.

    Well, let me try Alcoa’s custards and I’ll tell you my final opinion!

We’re back!

     After a long silence, Lisbon Stories’ blog is finally back.

     Many were the reasons why I stayed away from this blog for so long, but I’m defintely glad to be back.

     If you’re visiting Portugal and are looking for tips, travel advices, activities suggestions, recipes and much more, just stay tunned. Since this blog only makes sense with your feed-back, please feel free to use the comments box, as well as the “contact us” button and tell us what you’d like to read in this space.

    If you’ve been to Portugal and loved your experience here, then feel free to write a blog post. It can be about your experience, about a funny story, an attraction review… you pick, we publish!