How to order a cup of coffee in Portugal

     Most Portuguese people start their day the same way: with a shot of strong, black coffee, the famous and beloved “café” or “bica”. “Um café se faz favor” (one coffee please) might be the first words of the day, but they’ll be repeated.

      What do we drink? Our regular coffee is what’s generally called expresso: a shot of strong black coffee, normally with sugar. Obviously, we have some variations, the most popular among them being “garoto” (small espresso cup); or even an “italiana” for a really short coffee.

     Bigger sizes? A “meia-de-leite” (is a large cup, half is milk and the other half is coffee); a “galão (3/4 coffee, ¼ of milk); and “abatandado” is for American coffee. Just coffee? No. Normally we have a little pastry to go with it, but that’s a subject big enough for another post.

      Besides the energy boost, there’s also the social side. “Hey, do you want to have a coffee?” might be the easiest way to break the ice with a new work colleague or to catch up with a friend. Are you staying for a few days in the same place and want to meet someone? Go for coffee at the same place everyday: by day 4 the waiter will serve you without even asking what you want.

      What about coffee to go? There’s no such thing. Even if you’re having a quick cup of coffee on your way to work, it’s very likely that you’ll have a quick chat with the waiter or with the person standing next to you. Weather, soccer and breaking news are normally the topics.

2 thoughts on “How to order a cup of coffee in Portugal

  1. Thank the Lord we don’t have our Lisbon Java jolt “to go” in those horrid styrofoam coffee mugs – nice little porcelain cups are the only thing we want our “bicas” in here. Italians love our coffee too, just remember to have them order up the “italiana” version and they will be in heaven. Just more proof that the only two countries in Europe where you can be sure of a great espresso are Italy & of course Portugal!

    • Hi Mary,
      I completely agree with you.
      Italian coffee is just a bit bitter, so, it’s important to tell them to put a little bit less sugar than what they’re used to.
      Spanish people are learning now to enjoy expressos, maybe the trend will spread through Europe soon.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>